Workshops

Workshops that count toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate are indicated by an asterisk(*). Workshops that count toward the Writing Certificate are indicated by a plus sign(+). Workshops can only be counted for credit once unless otherwise indicated.

November 2018

Friday, November 2 / 9:30-11:30 am

Professional Portfolios are a great way to highlight skills and experiences that don’t fit on your curriculum vitae (CV) or resume.

For example –

  • Key graphics and messages from your publications or research presentations
  • Pictures and interesting finds from field campaigns or laboratory work
  • Samples of your course materials, e.g. syllabus, lessons, handouts
  • Student reviews, both qualitative and quantitative

A Portfolio can be a useful tool for job applications, and it can also be a good way to get your name and work noticed by others in your field. In Creating a Professional Portfolio workshop, we will walk you through what items to include and how to develop them. Then we will start setting up your own Portfolio online. We will look at examples of professional portfolio websites and discuss details on how to build one using wix.com. Bring your own laptop or borrow one from the library. Feel free to bring any digital content you want to add as well, there will be time for you to get help at the end.

Register Now

Monday, November 5 / 10:00-11:00 am

AND

Monday, November 12 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for managing conflict in the classroom. In the first session, we will examine various approaches to preventative and reactive conflict management, using real-life examples. In the second session, participants will role-play a variety of scenarios to practice assertive conflict management. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Register Now

Monday, November 5, 10:00 am-12:00 pm

OR

Friday, November 9, 10:00 am-12:00 pm (Engineering students only)

So you presented your research findings . . . now what? The Discussion section of an article explains the significance of your findings and provides readers with an interpretation of your results. Participants in this workshop will learn strategies that are appropriate for writing discussion and conclusion sections for individual journal articles and for dissertations/theses. Participants should bring at least two articles from their own discipline that include a “Discussion” section as well as a laptop and their own original research results to get the most out of this workshop.

Register Now (11/5 Workshop)

Register Now (11/9 Workshop with Engineering Focus)

Wednesday, November 7, 3:30 pm-4:30pm

In this workshop, we will discuss two formats in which academics and professionals are frequently called to present their scholarship: research posters and oral conference presentations. Although the research you are presenting in each format may be the same, audiences’ needs and what is possible in each presentational medium are not. This interactive workshop will offer participants strategies for crafting two key types of presentations—research posters and oral talks—in ways that effectively, memorably, and cohesively communicate your research for particular audiences.

Register Now (11/7 Workshop)

Thursday, November 8 / 10:00-11:00 am

AND

Thursday, November 15 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for managing conflict in the classroom. In the first session, we will examine various approaches to preventative and reactive conflict management, using real-life examples. In the second session, participants will role-play a variety of scenarios to practice assertive conflict management. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Register Now

Friday, November 9 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm

A growing number of students on college campuses are first-generation college students, meaning neither of their parents have earned a four-year degree. First-gen students face academic, financial, and sociocultural challenges at college, including knowledge of how to navigate university bureaucracy or financial resources to pursue unpaid internships and study abroad. It is critical for instructors to understand the challenges these students face in order to better support them.

During this workshop we will review the prevalence of first-gen students on college campuses, some of the challenges they face, and how instructors can better support them. A panel of student affairs professionals will join us to discuss best practices for working with this population.

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Wednesday, November 14/ 10:00 am-12:00 pm
This workshop gives you all of the tools needed to get started with using G Suite in academic and professional settings.

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Wednesday, November 14/ 1:00 pm-3:00 pm

Revise and Resubmit! (Committee Edition) In this workshop, we will discuss strategies for responding to feedback, focusing on feedback from faculty members on your thesis or dissertation committee. Participants will discuss how to synthesize, interpret, and process feedback from multiple readers; suggested practices for revising in response to divergent or conflicting feedback; and how to use “alpha” and “beta” readers to get targeted feedback at different stages of your writing process. This workshop is designed for graduate students who have feedback from their committees in hand but is open to anyone wishing to learn more about the process of responding to advisory committee feedback.

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Wednesday, November 14, 1:00 pm-3:00 pm

Revise and Resubmit! (Journal Peer Review Edition) In this workshop, you will practice strategies for responding to reviewers’ comments on article drafts such as how to synthesize feedback suggestions from multiple readers, how to communicate with journal editors, and how to revise your article. To get the most out of this workshop, you should bring comments that you have received and a draft of the article that you are working on. We will spend some time discussing sample reviewer comments from different disciplines; you will then use the strategies you’ve learned to interpret the comments you’ve received and revise your own article. This workshop is designed for graduate students who have feedback from journal reviewers in hand but is open to anyone wishing to learn more about the process of journal peer review.

Register Now

Monday, November 19 / 10:00-11:00 am / ONLINE

AND

Monday, November 26 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / ONLINE

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for writing a teaching statement that is professional yet personalized. In the first session, we will look at models of effective and ineffective teaching statements and hone our ability to critique and revise them. In the second session, participants will present their own draft teaching statements for peer review. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Register Now


Wednesday, November 28/ 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Are you new to Moodle or looking to refresh your Moodle skills? This workshop will provide hands-on guidance for using Moodle as an instructor in your face-to-face, blended, or online classes.  We will provide a broad overview of the most commonly used features, such as layout and navigation, activities and resources, and organizational strategies.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Navigate the Moodle interface as an instructor
  • Load and share course content with students
  • Identify the basic functionality of the most widely-used Moodle tools, including the gradebook setup and grading assignments through the Moodle interface
  • Apply best practices for organizing your Moodle course

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Thursday, November 29/ 10:00 am-12:00 pm
In this workshop, you will learn how to use Moodle to provide feedback on students’ assignments. Come practice grading right before this semester’s deadline for grades!
Register Now

December 2018

Monday, December 3 / 10:00-11:00 am

AND

Monday, December 10 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm

In this two-part workshop, we will consider best practices for reading, analyzing, and using the data from your course evaluations. How can you make your evaluations work for you, so that they become part of a cycle of reflective teaching practice? How can you use them as evidence of effective teaching in your job materials? How can you separate constructive criticism from ad hominem attacks and excessive praise? And how can you supplement your standard course evaluations to get the information you really need to improve your teaching?

Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Register Now

Friday, December 7 / 9:30-11:30 am

Professional Portfolios are a great way to highlight skills and experiences that don’t fit on your curriculum vitae (CV) or resume.

For example –

  • Key graphics and messages from your publications or research presentations
  • Pictures and interesting finds from field campaigns or laboratory work
  • Samples of your course materials, e.g. syllabus, lessons, handouts
  • Student reviews, both qualitative and quantitative

A Portfolio can be a useful tool for job applications, and it can also be a good way to get your name and work noticed by others in your field. In Creating a Professional Portfolio workshop, we will walk you through what items to include and how to develop them. Then we will start setting up your own Portfolio online. We will look at examples of professional portfolio websites and discuss details on how to build one using wix.com. Bring your own laptop or borrow one from the library. Feel free to bring any digital content you want to add as well, there will be time for you to get help at the end.

Register Now

January 2019

Friday, January 25 / 3:00-5:00pm/Daniels 214

Contact colleagues at NCState and beyond with tact and ease! In this workshop, you will gain strategies for crafting efficient, professional emails for a variety of purposes such as making inquiries, requesting letters of recommendation from faculty, and contacting researchers outside NCSU about their work. In addition to critiquing sample emails, you will apply these techniques to your own correspondence with faculty and/or in the workplace, and leave the session with a draft of an email message for future use. To get the most out of this session, you should bring a laptop and have access to emails that you have recently sent or received.  Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, January 28 / 10:00-11:00 am / ONLINE

AND

Monday, February 4 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / ONLINE

In this two-part workshop, we will go beyond formulating learning outcomes to consider their use for both course planning and assessment. In the first session, we will use backward course design concepts to practice using outcomes as planning and assessment tools. In the second session, participants will share an activity and assessment sequence that they’ve developed from a specific learning outcome. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

February 2019

This is an information session for students interested in participating in the department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering’s spring 3-Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.  Participants will learn about the structure of effective 3MT presentations and visuals. Using examples of past NCState 3MT winners’ performances, they will identify strategies for effectively presenting their research to broad audiences. They will also have the opportunity to practice these speaking techniques and receive feedback from the facilitators and peers.  While we will focus on Civil Engineering, this workshop will also benefit any graduate student in the College of Engineering who is interested in learning about NCState’s 3MT competitions and strategies for presenting their research to nonspecialist audiences.

RegisterNow

Friday, February 8/ 3:00-5:00 pm/Daniels 214

Abstracts and introductions give stakeholders crucial information about your research. In this workshop, you will learn how experienced academic writers craft these key components of research papers and articles. We will examine specific parts of abstracts and intros. You will have the opportunity to apply these techniques to your own written work and get feedback. To get the most out of this workshop, you should bring 1-2 articles with abstracts from your subdiscipline and a draft of an abstract and/or introduction you are working on. You may bring a laptop and/or hard copies of these deliverables.  Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, February 11 / 10:00-11:00 am / TBA

AND

Monday, February 18 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / TBA

In this two-part workshop, we will explore ways to engage with students’ diverse learning styles. In the first session, we will conduct a self-assessment and discuss concrete strategies to motivate students according to their learning style. In the second session, you will receive feedback on an activity that you designed based on what you learned in the first session. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

Friday, February 22/3:00pm-5:00pm/Daniels 214

So you presented your results . . . now what? The Discussion section of an article explains the significance of your findings and provides readers with an interpretation and applications of your results. In this workshop, you will learn and practice appropriate strategies for writing discussion and conclusion sections for research papers,  journal articles and for dissertations/theses. You should bring 1-2 articles from your subdiscipline that include a “Discussion” section, as well as a laptop and their own research results to get the most out of this workshop. Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, February 25 / 10:00-11:00 am / ONLINE

AND

Monday, March 4 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / ONLINE

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies to make PowerPoint slides more visually engaging and interactive. In the first session, we will analyze effective and ineffective forms of visual communication. In the second session, you will present your own slide(s) for peer review. Slides can be course- or research-based. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

March 2019

Friday, March 8/3:00pm-5:00pm/214 Daniels Hall

Research posters and oral presentations are two formats in which engineers are frequently called to present their scholarship. Although the results you are presenting in each format may be the same, users’ needs and what is possible in each format are not. In this interactive workshop, you will  practice strategies for crafting two key types of presentations—research posters and oral research meeting talks—in ways that effectively, memorably, and cohesively communicate your research for an audience. To get the most out of this workshop, you should bring a laptop and have access to notes about your research project. Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, March 11 / 10:00-11:00 am / TBA

AND

Monday, March 18 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / TBA

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for delivering a compelling, accessible academic job talk. In the first session, participants will reflect on the purpose of their talk as well as its audience, and will engage in a number of exercises to help them pitch their research to an interdisciplinary audience. In the second session, 1-3 speakers will present their job talk for peer review. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

Friday, March 22/3:00 pm-5:00 pm/214 Daniels Hall

Update stakeholders about your project! In this workshop, you will learn and practices techniques that experienced writers use to communicate with nontechnical stakeholders. You will discuss key components of progress reports and apply these techniques to craft your own reports. To get the most out of this workshop, you should bring 1-2 examples of reports aimed at nonspecialist audiences and drafts of a report you are working on. You may bring a laptop and/or paper copies of these deliverables. Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, March 25 / 10:00-11:00 am / TBA

AND

Monday, April 1 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / TBA

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for managing conflict in the classroom. In the first session, we will examine various approaches to preventative and reactive conflict management, using real-life examples. In the second session, participants will role-play a variety of scenarios to practice assertive conflict management. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

April 2019

Friday, April 5/3:00 PM-5:00 PM/214 Daniels Hall

From dissertation plans to NSF statements to pitches, proposals are ultimately persuasive documents that convince diverse stakeholders to invest in your project or product. In this workshop, you’ll examine and apply techniques that are common to different kinds of proposals. You will also apply and test these strategies in a draft of your own persuasive proposal. To get the most out of this workshop, you should bring an example of “persuasive” writing in your subdiscipline (dissertation proposal, grant application, pitch etc.) as well as a draft of a persuasive document that you are working on. You may bring a laptop and/or paper copies of these deliverables.  Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

Register Now

Monday, April 8 / 10:00-11:00 am / ONLINE

AND

Monday, April 15 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / ONLINE

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for writing a teaching statement that is professional yet personalized. In the first session, we will look at models of effective and ineffective teaching statements and hone our ability to critique and revise them. In the second session, participants will present their own draft teaching statements for peer review. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience. Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

Monday, April 22 / 10:00-11:00 am / TBA

AND

Monday, April 29 / 10:00 am-12:00 pm / TBA

In this two-part workshop, we will consider best practices for reading, analyzing, and using the data from your course evaluations. How can you make your evaluations work for you, so that they become part of a cycle of reflective teaching practice? How can you use them as evidence of effective teaching in your job materials? How can you separate constructive criticism from ad hominem attacks and excessive praise? And how can you supplement your standard course evaluations to get the information you really need to improve your teaching? Attendance at both sessions is mandatory.

Registration coming soon

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, NC State will honor requests for reasonable accommodations made by individuals with disabilities. Requests can be served effectively if notice is provided at least 10 days before the event. Direct accommodation requests for professional development programs to professional-development@ncsu.edu.

Attendance Policy

Participants who cancel their registration for any Professional Development event (e.g., workshops, seminars, symposia) more than 24 hours before the first session of an event will not be penalized. Registrants who fail to attend an event or who cancel their registration less than 24 hours before the first session of an event will be marked as a “No Show” for the event. Those with two recorded “No Shows” will automatically be dropped from all future Professional Development events for the remainder of the semester in which the two “No Shows” occur.

This policy is in place to encourage students to practice time management and professionalism. The instructors create materials and activities based on attendance so this information needs to be as accurate as possible in order for participants to get the most out of the session.

For development series, please review the syllabus for the attendance policy specific to your course.

Professional Development Newsletter

We are pleased to announce our new weekly newsletter! Enter your email here to subscribe to the newsletter and receive the latest information about professional development programming.

Digital Badges

The professional development team is pleased to announce new opportunities for digital credentialing. We will be issuing evidence-based badges through the Graduate School NC State account at Badge List. You can display the badges you’ve earned on your LinkedIn page. Create an account to get started, then join our group using this code: gradpack. We will add new badges throughout the year, so check back often.