Eligible Activities

The following activities may be applied towards the Teaching and Communication Certificate. Registration for workshops and semester-long development series is available through REPORTER.

Workshops

In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for making your first day in the classroom a success. In the first session, we will discuss and practice lesson planning. In the second, you will “microteach” a brief lesson and receive feedback. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for writing a teaching statement that is professional yet personalized. In the first session, we will look at models of effective and ineffective teaching statements and hone our ability to critique and revise them. In the second session, participants will present their own draft teaching statements for peer review. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for managing conflict in the classroom. In the first session, we will examine various approaches to preventative and reactive conflict management, using real-life examples. In the second session, participants will role-play a variety of scenarios to practice assertive conflict management. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies to make PowerPoint slides more visually engaging and interactive. In the first session, we will analyze effective and ineffective forms of visual communication. In the second session, you will present your own slide(s) for peer review. Slides can be course- or research-based. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this workshop we will cover topics to help you become a more effective presenter and public speaker. This workshop will NOT focus on the creation of visuals for presentations, but rather the information you will include, the delivery, and body language.
You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.

In this two-part workshop, we will explore ways to engage with students’ diverse learning styles. In the first session, we will conduct a self-assessment and discuss concrete strategies to motivate students according to their learning style. In the second session, you will receive feedback on an activity that you designed based on what you learned in the first session. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this two-part workshop, we will explore strategies for delivering a compelling, accessible academic job talk. In the first session, participants will reflect on the purpose of their talk as well as its audience, and will engage in a number of exercises to help them pitch their research to an interdisciplinary audience. In the second session, 1-3 speakers will present their job talk for peer review. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


In this two-part workshop, we will go beyond formulating learning outcomes to consider their use for both course planning and assessment. In the first session, we will use backward course design concepts to practice using outcomes as planning and assessment tools. In the second session, participants will share an activity and assessment sequence that they’ve developed from a specific learning outcome. Open to ALL graduate students and postdocs regardless of your teaching experience.

You may apply up to 3 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.

This workshop introduces students to expectations for graduate student writers. We will cover important issues such as writing into a scholarly community, choosing an appropriate citation style, and much more. Participants will be exposed to academic writing pedagogy in the United States as well as cultural variations in learning styles.

Copyright agreements are a part of the publication process that many scholars struggle to understand, but the terms of those contracts can limit how many people see your work, make it difficult to comply with mandates from your funding agencies, and cost you a fair share of your royalties. Similarly, copyright anxiety in the classroom can limit your ability to be an inspiring instructor. Join Will Cross, an attorney in the Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, for a discussion about what those contracts say and what you can do to make sure you have the rights you need as a scholarly author and instructor. Sometimes the most important writing you do is in your contract.

You may apply up to 2 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.

This is an introductory workshop focused on the basics of Moodle.  Our workshop will take place in ITTC Lab 2 at D.H. Hill Library.  This space is a more collaborative design than the traditional “computer lab” model, so there are no desktop computers.  We invite you to bring your own laptop.  Otherwise, a set of MacBook Airs are also available upon request for your use during the workshop.  If you wish to bring a charger, the lab has ample outlets to support your need.

You may apply up to 2 hours from this workshop toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.

Development Series

This development series aims to provide graduate students and postdoctoral scholars with an introduction to “backward course design,” a method that involves structuring course content according to desired results rather than “coverage.” We will practice writing learning outcomes that can be used for purposes of design and assessment, refine a discipline-specific syllabus through multiple peer-reviewed drafts, and consider the syllabus as a starting point for the creation of individual lesson plans as well as full-scale curricula. Finally, we will explore the uses of instructional technology in the context of course design. Participants can include the syllabus in their professional portfolio as evidence of their ability to apply a results-oriented methodology to the management of a learning and/or working environment.

You may apply up to 44 hours from this development series toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


The Teaching and Presentation Practicum is designed to give graduate students at all levels, as well as postdoctoral scholars, the opportunity to engage in microteaching opportunities that will allow you to develop and refine your teaching and presentation skills in a supportive environment. You will read about a variety of strategies along with concrete examples of how they are used before tailoring specific strategies to your field of expertise. Each microteaching segment will be digitally recorded so that you have the opportunity to assess your own work; you will also benefit from giving and receiving constructive peer feedback related to teaching and presentation skills. Your final project will involve revising a previously taught segment in order to improve its efficacy. The recording of your project can be used in your professional portfolio as evidence of your teaching skills.

You may apply up to 44 hours from this development series toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.


This development series aims to improve international graduate students’ and international postdoctoral scholars’ writing by improving their awareness of rhetorical concepts, reading and notetaking strategies, academic writing strategies, library-based research skills, discipline specific writing conventions and vocabulary, peer review and revision, and publishing options and procedures. During the semester, participants will go through all stages (reading, research, writing, peer review, editing, and publication) of the writing process. By the end of the development series, participants will have a complete or nearly complete piece of academic writing that can be submitted for publication. In addition to meeting in-person, this class will occasionally meet online. Any meetings that will be online will be noted in the syllabus ahead of time.
You may apply up to 32 hours from this development series toward the Teaching and Communication Certificate.

Credit-Bearing Courses from Our Partners

This special topics course will examine the theory, practice, and research and evaluation
of learning in informal contexts. The main focus of the coursework will involve collaborative projects working with community partners who offer informal learning programs. Examples of possible community partners are the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, NC Museum of Art, NC Museum of History, NC Farmer’s Market, and NCSU Libraries. Taught by Dr. K.C. Busch.